Category Archives: Digital drawing

Of the eye (and some of the mind)

Pop Up On Line Exhibition

Inspired by another artist, I decided to exhibit some of my work on line in a small exhibition. The photographic works are of the nature I see on my walks in the river valley, in particular ice and water, and also a little of what I see when I’m paying attention in the moment.  My digital drawings are pieces that developed while working on specific series or were a side product of that work.  As I don’t often set out with a specific idea in mind, I look at the shapes, shadows, and lines I have made to determine where a piece will go.  

Want to know more about me?  Check out my biography, or some of my meet the maker posts from March.  

You can also check out three of these pieces at Harcourt House’s Art O Rama 2019 until December 16th.  

 

 

Unless otherwise stated, all work is professionally printed on high quality art paper.  Pricing for 2019 is as follows*:

Limited edition prints

Size

Unframed

Framed

8 x 10  

edition of 10

$95

$120

11 x 14

edition of 5

$140

$160

16 x 20

edition of 5

$170

$200

14 x 24

edition of 5

$195

$245

18 x 24

edition of 5

$220

$260

24 x 30

edition of 3

$320

$415 (glass)

$425 (plexi)

24 x 36

edition of 3

$345

$450

*Prices subject to change without notice. 

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Art O Rama – Harcourt House

Art O Rama is Harcourt House Artist Run Centre’s members show and fundraiser December 6-14th, 2019. This holiday market provides the rare opportunity to acquire affordable, original, small format works for $500 or less in a variety of media including: painting, sculpture, printmaking, drawing, photography, glass, ceramics, jewelry, metal design works, and mixed media compositions.  Proceeds are split between the artist and the centre, which uses the funds to continue to support artists and exhibitions, and develop engaging public programming.   

Looking for something special for your home or a gift for someone for Christmas?  Come out and check out what Art O Rama has to offer.  This year there are events planned on Friday and Saturday of the opening weekend (click the link for details).  I have three pieces in this show.  Come down and check it out 🙂 

The Main and Art Incubator Galleries: December 6 – 14, 2019
Opening Reception: Friday, December 6, from 7 pm – 10 pm
Art-O-Rama Brunch: Saturday, December 7, from 12 pm – 6 pm
Harcourt House Artist Run Centre, 3rd floor, 10215 – 112 St, Edmonton

Extended Hours:
Monday Dec 9 – Friday Dec 13, 10 am – 7 pm
Saturdays Dec 7/14, 10 am – 6 pm
Sunday Dec 8, 10 am – 5 pm

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New series in progress & DIY light table

Light table

In a previous post, I mentioned I am working on a new series for a solo show at Harcourt House Artist-Run Centre‘s Art Incubator Gallery in 2020.  I would like to incorporate text into the series in some way.  So far I have spent a lot of time thinking about how this might work and I have not been satisfied with my attempts.  

Last week having trouble sleeping, as can happen when anxiety levels are high, I thought about a different method using embossing.  Some excited searching at 1:30 am made me think it could work.   Lucky for me I had some supplies at the ready, due to a brief flirtation with scrapbooking in the early 2000’s.  The next step was to find the right material to work with.  My work is digital and I have not bought art supplies in a long while, however I do still have a fairly good assortment of paper from my traditional art material days.  After some unsuccessful attempts, I went to You Tube to look up embossing (spoiler alert – the stencil goes under the paper).  Next step was to think about making stencils.  After trying to trace on paper taped to a window, I realized this was not sustainable.  My arm was aching something fierce.

Experimenting with paper

 

DIY Light table – dust-free, chemical-free, one stop shop

Next step, searching light tables.  These can be a bit pricey, from $60-$150 depending on what size you would like to have.  If I was going to trace things all the time, I could see making the investment, but for now I want a cheaper option.  After looking up DIY light tables I was starting to think I would need to check out some used furniture places for a glass topped end table (not my favourite activity as I find they are like a dust mite rave and I have a strong reaction). Most of the information I found in blogs involved using a router or sawing, getting a specific size of acrylic sheeting, spray painting, etc.  I wanted a dust-free, chemical-free one-stop shop kind of option.  I checked out Ikea, based on a comment made by a blogger about using an Ikea picture frame and some LED lights.  Success!  I didn’t think a picture frame would work, now that Ikea uses a thinner plastic for their glazing, but I did find another option.  

I purchased the Nesna Nightstand on sale, then sourced a white cardboard box (note: white to increase reflectivity) in the home organization section and purchased LED string lights (lights do not get hot so won’t be a fire hazard).  After assembling the nightstand, I put the lights into the box and slid the box under the table top, using the lid to raise it up for a snug fit.  Once I knew it would fit, I used a piece of paper palette left over from my painting days and taped it to the underside of the glass top with painter’s tape (you could use waxed paper or white tissue paper).  I didn’t want to make it permanent as I want to be able to repurpose the table when I don’t need it as a light table.  All in all I am pleased with the result.  It cost me about $30.  I am thinking of replacing the LED string lights with an LED camping lantern I found in the basement, as I’d like the light to be a bit stronger.  My Ikea was out of the 24 light strand, so I bought two 12 light strands, which are ok but not as bright as I’d like.  As you can see in the photo below, it will fit a pice of 9″x12″ paper.  

Light table

Light table

 

To make it more permanent, you could close in the sides and bottom of the table and/or use LED strip lighting, however this will increase your costs so you’ll have to decide if it still makes sense to DIY.  If you would like a larger table and you don’t mind dust, chemicals and using tools, I found this video, as well as several other options.  

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Meet the Maker March 29

Photo credit: Lindsay the Grateful

Art in the wild

In 2016 my artwork Dream a little dream was chosen to be a part of #YEGCANVAS, which is a rotating display of art in transit centres and on billboards throughout the city.

©Deann Stein Hasinof f#YEGCANVAS 2016

Art playing with other art

Sometimes art gets to go out and play with other art. Here are a couple of photos from Incubator 2015 at Latitude 53 Gallery.

L-R: Armour (Deann Stein Hasinoff), work by David J. Nyffeler, Apart (©Deann Stein Hasinoff), work by Carmyn Joy Effa
Left (above and below): work by Jeremy Tsang Right: Mise-en-scène (Deann Stein Hasinoff)

Domesticated art

If you have one of my artworks, I’d love to see a photo of it installed in your space. As for me I have some of my art hanging (or in some cases leaning) in my home. Here are a couple of photos.

©Deann Stein Hasinoff Spirit 2015
©Deann Stein Hasinoff Left: Dream a little dream 2015, Right: Stillness 2016 Middle: Sonya Iwasiuk

March Meet the Maker has been fun! It’s given me motivation to sit down and write about different aspects of my art practice. I enjoyed it and I hope you did too.

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Meet the Maker March 20

Photo credit: Lindsay the Grateful

Process: Every artist has their own way of getting started. Some do a lot of sketches, others are inspired by things they see or read, some just dive in and figure it out as they go. I get inspiration from life experiences, music, poetry, other things I read, and nature. To get started, I just draw. Starting a painting is called laying down a ground (a base). When I work, I often draw lots of grounds with no set idea and see if something appears that I want to expand on. This way of working is called automatism. Artists like Joan Miró, Paul-Émile Borduas and Jean-Paul Riopelle used automatism during their careers to create spontaneous works of art. Sometimes I will let the ground sit for a long time before working with it again and other times can see where I want the drawing to go right away. One I am working on now, I first drew in 2016. Other times I have an idea in mind and I work to create that vision. It’s a very intuitive process. One thing you do not want to do is overwork it. It’s hard to know when you’ve hit that point. I find when I am revisiting small details over and over, it’s time to ignore the drawing for a while and then revisit it with fresh eyes. Usually when I do that, I’ll decide it’s done.

©Deann Stein Hasinoff Stillness 2016
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Meet the Maker March 19

Photo credit: Lindsay the Grateful

Dream collaboration: This is a really tough one that’s firmly in dream territory. There are lots of artists I admire for different reasons. I think I would go with another artist who’s work I find very inspiring, Helen Frakenthaler (December 12, 1928 – December 27, 2011). I was able to see some of her print works over the summer in Chicago, which was very exciting. To make them, Frankenthaler collaborated with master print makers so I feel like she would be comfortable with the idea of working with another artist. I, on the other hand, usually prefer to work alone 😀 Maybe I would even venture into the land of colour!

As for a living person, living artists I admire include Ira Hoffecker, Robin Smith Peck, Paddy Lamb and Sean Caulfield. Lucky for me I get to see their work without having to travel far afield. The latter two I’ve had the privilege of hearing talk about their art. I could learn so much from all of these artists. So, if any are looking for a collaboration, give me a call 😉

©Deann Stein Hasinoff Fragment 2017
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Meet the Maker March 18

Photo credit: Lindsay the Grateful

Mistake or lesson

Mistake: In art like in other aspects of life there can be happy mistakes. When working on a piece, you get attached to certain aspects of it and they start to hold you back. You want to keep them, but you can’t seem to resolve (i.e. finish) the work. You either decide to take out one or all of the things you like, or you make a mistake that removes something. Then suddenly you get a renewed creative burst. Those are the fun mistakes.

A not so fun mistake is to, let’s say, not set your paper correctly on the cutting mat and then cut it an inch too short, the day before you are to hang your show. Thankfully for me I have a great framer nearby who was able to problem solve and cut a mat for me. Pro tip: get a mat the same colour as the frame so it looks like an extension of the frame. Oh and double check where zero is on your cutting mat and measure twice, cut once 🙂

©Deann Stein Hasinoff
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Meet the Maker March 17

Photo credit: Lindsay the Grateful

What I am working on: My digital work at the moment is focusing on anxiety. It will be the focus of my show at Harcourt House Artist Run Centre‘s Art Incubator Gallery in the summer of 2020. I am looking at using text as well as trying some larger format prints. We’ll see how it all comes together, and I am excited about the challenge.

©Deann Stein Hasinoff Going down the rabbit hole 2 2018 – in progress
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Meet the Maker March 16

Photo credit: Lindsay the Grateful

Workspace: My workspace is very portable. I use my iPhone a lot to do drawings when I am on the go. I have worked on drawings in waiting rooms, offices, various sports venues, pools, etc. If I’m home I will work on my iPad. My preferred place to work is my living room with some decaf coffee by my side. Access to a little organic, soy-free chocolate never hurts either 🙂 

©Deann Stein Hasinoff In the studio 2017
©Deann Stein Hasinoff Spirit 2015
©Deann Stein Hasinoff Anchor 2017
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Meet the Maker March 15

CARFAC Alberta’s Ten Voices group show, Southern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium August 2017

Goals/Motivation & Upcoming Show

Goals: My art goal is to continue to grow, now that I am done with course work . I am limited in the sense that I cannot try new materials but I try to find other ways to stretch. I am working on incorporating text into some of my work. It is harder to do than I imagined so there is lots of failure, or rather practice, happening. I recently got an Apple pencil, which may help with what I am trying to achieve.

My career goal is to have one group or solo show per year. I was lucky to have a very supportive instructor, Brenda Malkinson, who encouraged me to apply for my first group show in 2015. I didn’t think I had any chance but I was happy to be wrong! I participated in Latitude 53’s Incubator group show and the same year I had a drawing published in aceartinc’s PaperWait arts publication. Since then I have participated in #YEGCANVAS, and CARFAC Alberta’s Ten Voices. My solo show All exits look the same was at the ArtPoint Upstairs Gallery in Calgary in 2018. So far, I have skipped 2019.

I will have a show at Harcourt House Artist Run Centre‘s Incubator Gallery in the summer of 2020.

©Deann Stein Hasinoff All exits look the same Extension Gallery, University of Alberta October 2017

Motivation: I like to be challenged, or I start to get bored, and I love practical problem solving. Bringing an idea to life, along with applying art principles is very satisfying for me. Visually abstracting the idea adds an extra layer of challenge which I enjoy. My other motivation is to bring forward subjects that are not part of our regular conversation, in hopes that it will encourage people to talk with others, and in doing so make it a more accepted aspect of our interactions.

©DeannSteinHasinoff Isolation I 2015
©Deann Stein Hasinoff Safe? 2018
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